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20121205
20121213
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about the fiscal cliff and 15% say it means they will spend less on christmas. it's pre-telling, right? >> apparently the walmart shopper is more informed than the average american. we showed 70%. that's out there. it's something that affects people. it was clear in the data there was an effect of the fiscal cliff on overall economic attitudes. the more important thing we found is that it affects businesses and businesses slow down in capital spending. you're an economic student and you know the connection between company spending to buy big capital goods, buy machinery and hiring the thing everybody wants to have happen in this country. the other thing interesting in the fed survey yesterday, michelle, 41% say we are going to go over. 46% say no. 13% aren't sure. personally, i add the -- people think we're going over the cliff to those who aren't sure, i come up with 54%. more than half of the people think it will either happen or uncertain if they're going to happen and both lead to a lousy outcome of uncertainty and holding back. >> good point. thank you. >> cnbc's coverage begins 1
anything done. the fiscal cliff hits. the arguments i just pa about the withholding tables and cutting spending, are not generally talked about. a lot of people deny they can be done. we're confident they can. so the question then becomes what's the impact, where is the impact. and the impact is equity markets end of next week will say these guys aren't going to get it done, we won't have a deal january 1, everything falls apart, that's assuming of course we all get past december 21st. >> so basically week and counting before you think the equity market really drops significantly? >> if we do get a deal done do, we just maintain the 2% that we're stuck in with the high unemployment and not go down? or does it actually allow us to start growing again? is anybody talking growth? >> we're talking growth. >> is it possible to ever get back to that in this environment? >> it is. you have a lot of problems with the piece. >> do you briyou believe if you rote deficit -- two different ways. you either keep the government that you have and pay for it by raising taxes, or you kind of leave taxes
, president obama and house speaker boehner spending a sunday together to talk about the fiscal cliff. no word on any progress and the president will be in detroit today to speak about the economy. joining us right now is cnbc's chief washington correspondent john harwood. john, you had a great column over the weekend in the in, times whether you took a look back at what happened in 1990 where things were set up for a grit debate but maybe things were easier at that point because you didn't have the 24-hour news cycle. you had other things that made it easier the last time around. what does that lead us to think this time around? >> well, there are ways in which it was more difficult, as you just alluded to, becky. but there are a lot of similarities, too. there are warnings that the economy is going to take a huge hit if a multi year budget deal was not enacted. you had a republican party led by a president who had made a no tax pledge and who was trying to figure out a way out of that. when he finally did that, that's when the negotiations took on a faster pace. and i do think here the fact
when we look at the fiscal cliff and everything else in terms of actual cuts in spending, everybody recoils in horror because they know it implies. >> you made your point, though, we surrendered to fdr, and instead of supplementing people, instead of letting them earn their own success, we're going to somehow try to deal with outcome rather than opportunity and pay for it. and you want to pay for -- >> no, i don't. >> in a fairer society. what you see as a fairer society. >> i didn't say it was a fairer society. but chris brought up an important point. and i want people to talk about the "wall street journal" today. we're not talking about cutting spending, not talking about cutting growth rates, which is a huge difference, one reason why people like me look at former presidential candidate mitt romney talk about npr or planned parenthood. the number one answer for balancing the budget is foreign aid. which if you really wanted to balance the budget and you don't always have to go to the department of justice or whatever it may be. but over the next ten years, 90% of federal outlays
's an electronic thing. they're typing it essentially. >> will the resolution of the fiscal cliff and even some progress on our long-term problems, knowing that at best we're just putting off austerity, sooner or later it's coming, right? higher taxes and lower government spending, right? you combine that with reinhardt, rogoff and the idea we're in a 2% world all of a sudden, would doing the fiscal cliff make it possible to do 5% or are we just -- we know austerity's coming and we know -- i'm saying we've got a lot of debt -- i'm saying that we are maybe in a new -- we might be in a new normal. is there any reason to think we could do a 4% or 5%? >> nobody wants to take an automatic hit. the number you want to achieve and achieve it quickly, that's one aspect, but no one wants a huge hit, for example, to defense spending. >> do you think we'll get to 7% in unemployment? >> i do. 6.9%. >> even though we're facing the same kind of austerity as europe. >> i think american companies put americans back to work. >> and freeing up the corporate cash will overcome -- >> get rid of the uncertainty. >>
for the fiscal cliff? modest proposal. i've read things like that before. >> i'm talking about the -- look, did i mention once the tax increase? >> no. >> i'm going for quick spending cuts. because we just -- we agreed to give the rich people that deal two years ago, we added a trillion and then another trillion. i don't know why a republican ever agreed to that. i'm trying to figure out -- >> it wasn't -- >> who the heck -- >> wasn't because of the 2%. >> because it kept -- >> it kept the deal from happening. >> by given the -- added 2 trillion to the deficit. i hated that. try to find out how to cut that deficit now. not the future. >> we've got a lot more 20 come this morning. >> thanks, guys. crazy conversation. we'll see where it goes. comments, questions about anything you see on "squawk," tweet us @squawkcnbc. coming up, holiday central. the ceo of phillips v-van heuse. >> who? phillips-van heusen joining us on the set. he's dressed head to toe in calvin klein and he's here with one of his company's largest shareholders cliff robins. i don't know if he's dressed in calvin klein. we'll find
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6